REVIEW: Dog Whisperer Cesar Milan Family Edition

Not at all an interesting show and no real substance to it.

Attribution: Author is Raven Underwood.  Originally posted to Flickr.com, uploaded to Commons using Flickr upload bot on 21:26, 20 May 2007 (UTC) by  Pharaoh Hound (talk).

Attribution: Author is Raven Underwood. Originally posted to Flickr.com, uploaded to Commons using Flickr upload bot on 21:26, 20 May 2007 (UTC) by Pharaoh Hound (talk).

 

In this episode, actor Kelsey Grammer and his wife have two miniature dachshunds, George and Elvis, who have no manners and call all the shots in the home.  They have no real structure and no consistency in training or stopping bad behaviors.  The dogs bark, get on the table, pull when walking and won’t give way when the door is being answered.

 

 

If he is still using those scientifically dis-proven outdated techniques – his dominance theory techniques of hitting, kicking, hanging and other abusive methods to train dogs – it appears they editing it out before broadcast.

I did hear Cesar’s ignorant bull over-generalizing modern dogs and children:  “Modern dogs don’t know how to wait, Modern children and dogs don’t know how to wait.”  He’s playing off something that the older generation believes, despite the fact that, yes, some modern dogs and children do know how to wait, but the trainers/parents must be consistent in remind them that waiting is expected.

 

He is totally correct about there being no structure and consistency in the house when it comes to training the dogs.  I did notice that they did have pinch collars on the dogs before replacing them with a slip leash prior to  taking the dogs for a walk.  I also notice that he is still using that worthless and annoying “shh” noise.  He used it at the door once or twice and then again when they approach the geese instead of providing a better distraction that interested dog over the geese.

When you stay calm and assertive (not dominant) everyone does benefit.  I mentioned above that the dominance theory is outdated and scientifically proven to be a dangerous training technique.  Positive techniques have been proven to be more successful and increases the bond between the pet parent and animal.  I use to use the dominance theory when I first started training dog’s in the middle 80’s but switched to the positive reinforcement in the early 90’s and found that the positive training was more effective.