Is Your Dog A Wolf

Trojan and Gitli near the fireplaceVictoria Stilwell recent article is Dogs vs. Wolves  and discusses the importance of getting away from comparing dogs to wolves.  Victoria Stilwell  “Many people assume that since dogs evolved from their wolf-like ancestors, we can and should easily draw parallels between the two species and use what we see in wolf behavior to help explain how to understand our domesticated dogs. Bad idea.”

Her article was timed well with another article Dog Behavior and Training – Dominance, Alpha, and Pack Leadership – What Does It Really Mean?

I have had experiences working with wolves and dogs.  I do see a lot of similar behavior between the two.  I have even gotten away from comparing dogs and wolves.  I don’t like the dominance theory training where animals are hit, kicked, hanged, etc just to break their spirit and force them into submission.  First off anyone knows that wolves don’t do this.  As well anyone who is trained well knows that a wolf pack is a family containing a father, a mother, and their siblings.  The Alpha and the Beta theory are long gone and is commonly used in the dominance theory on training dogs.

There is a lot of scientific proof that this type of training does more harm then good.  The other reason why I have gotten away from this theory is because some raw feeders try to justify given only raw meat to their dogs by comparing them to wolves by claiming wolves only eat meat.  YEA RIGHT! I have seen wolves eat vegetables, roots, and fruit.

There is a good article on Science Daily called Genomes of modern dogs and wolves provide new insights on domestication, which does mention that dogs and wolves did evolve from a common ancestor between 9,000 and 34,000 years ago.  According to this article the genetic overlap with wolves and dogs is because of the interbreeding after the dog domestication not because of a direct line of descent from a one group of wolves.

It’s time to learn more about canine behavior especially within a family grouping and stop focusing on outdated information and theories.

Tick Born Diseases Are On The Rise

Trojan on a tree stumpSummer arrived quickly approached is just about done, September is a few weeks away. With the rise in temperatures come the increase in ticks.  But we are in the height of summer and this means that mountain trails, bucolic meadows and forested thickets, and even your own backyard beckons you and your dog to romp and explore. Depending on your area, Heartworm Disease, Lyme Disease,  Ehrlichiosis, and Anaplasmosis are on the rise due to the increase population of ticks.

At the beginning of spring I heard reports of Lyme Disease and Ehrlichiosis we already on the rise.  I know a family whose dog picked up Ehrlichiosis despite all their attempts to keep the dog tick free.  It was sick for weeks and they were not sure if the dog was going to pull through, but he did.  Last year we had a friend whose spouse had died from Ehrlichiosis despite their attempts to keep ticks away.

This year as my own dogs went to the vet for their check up, Trojan and Gitli had their heartworm tests and I noticed these test were more expensive this year.  I found out that vets can now check for Heartworm, Lyme Disease, several type of  Ehrlichiosis, and Anaplasmosis.  Except for the Heartworm the others are all tick borne diseases.  Their test results were all negative.

To learn more about these diseases click on Heartworm Disease/Lyme Disease/Ehrlichiosis/Anaplasmosis “SNAP” Testing in Dogs from Vet Street Your Pet Your Vet.

To learn how to better protect yourself and your pet click on Lyme Disease – An Emerging Problem.

Did you know humans can get Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever even if they have never been to the Rocky Mountains?  This disease is named after the location it was first found but Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is carried by the Lone Star Tick.  So anywhere a Lone Star Tick, could be that it might be carrying the disease.

Don’t let the ticks ruin your fun outdoors, educate yourself on what species of ticks are in your area, what they carry that could affect you and your pets, how to get tested for it, what remedies are available and how to protect yourself and your pets.