Diamond Food Recall Goes Global; Lawsuit Filed


Recall Update (May 30, 6:30 p.m. Eastern): U.S. Food and Drug Administration spokeswoman Laura Alvey stated Tuesday, that Salmonella contamination found at Diamond’s Meta, Missouri plant is not from the same strain as that of the Gaston, South Carolina plant. The contamination at the Missouri plant comes from Salmonella Liverpool, while the South Carolina plant — connected to all products except those in the most recent recall expansion — has been contaminated by Salmonella Infantis.

The Missouri plant has now been included in the FDA’s ongoing investigation into the  Salmonella outbreak and recall.  Diamond also has a facility in Lathrop, California which is not included in the plants producing contaminated food, at this time.

Pets are rarely tested for Salmonella, making it impossible to estimate the number ill from the contamination.  On May 29, 2012 Law.com reports a lawsuit was filed alleging an infant got Salmonella-tainted dog food making it the first case in the wake of a series of messy pet food recall expansions and corrections.

After expanding the recall at least eight times, writers are frustrated by the coverage and confusion.  The Diamond recall missteps include corrections to use by dates and production codes.  The company seems to make and the correct and expand the slip ups, as documented in correction notices on the Diamond website where the best before date first changed to December 2012 through April 7, 2012.

Later changes in code and dates were corrected to “The below list of product with production codes that must have both a number “3” in the 9th position AND an “X” in the 10th or 11th position with best before dates of December 9, 2012, through January 31, 2013 which are being recalled.”

 

“Please note:  we have CORRECTED the production codes below.”  The original announcement of recall of Chicken Soup dog food required yet another change in the production codes.

Microbiologist and eFoodAlert writer, Phyllis Entis has established that pet owners in Ireland and France have reported their dogs became sick after eating Taste of the Wild, one of the recalled brands.

On May 21, the public health arm of the Singapore government released a consumer advisory on the recall. Four of the nine affected brands are sold in Singapore.

On the day of the most recent recall expansion, the Calgary Herald in Alberta reported that two cats in a Montreal animal shelter died after eating recalled cat food. Around that same time, another human case was reported in Nova Scotia, bringing the confirmed human cases to 17: 15 in the U.S. and 2 in Canada.

“This stuff is all around the world,” Entis said. “There are a lot of countries where this product might be, but Diamond — to the best of my knowledge — has not released a list of countries.”

What are the symptoms in humans? Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever are indications of salmonella poisoning. Rarely, salmonella can result in more serious ailments including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

 

What are some non-Diamond pet foods that might be good alternatives?  It’s understandable that pet owners would be wary of simply replacing their Diamond product with another from a different lot. Customers who want affordable alternatives to Diamond’s Chicken Soup or Taste of the Wild might consider Life’s Abundance, Earthborn or Fromm brands. They are of comparable price.  In 14 years of business, Life’s Abundance has never been recalled.

 

While some dog foods proudly fly American flags on their packaging or tout that they are “made in America”, that doesn’t mean the ingredients are all sourced in the U.S. It means they are assembled in the U.S. This expanding recall is yet another example of why it makes sense to get dog food from a company that has tighter quality control methods in place and has never had recalls, voluntary or FDA.  Companies like Life’s Abundance make food from higher grade ingredients and in small batches which significantly improves quality control.  And having the food on autoship means if there ever is a problem, the batches can be tracked quickly to avoid serious problems.

 

What are symptoms of salmonella infection in dogs and cats?

Initial symptoms include:

  • Decreased appetite
  • Fever
  • Abdominal pain

 

If your pet has consumed dry food from one of the tainted lots and has symptoms of salmonella infection, please contact your veterinarian.

If left untreated, dogs may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has symptoms of salmonella infection, please contact your veterinarian.

How to Choose a New Food for Your Pet;

Do You Really Know What’s In Your Pet Food?

Public Service Announcement from Veterinarian, Dr. Sarah saying yes dogs and cats and get salmonella to.

Joyce Rheal is Emergency Planning Committee chairwoman of the National Association Professional Pet Sitters and with Pets-life. Joyce is also a federally certified instructor for FEMA’s “Animals in Disasters” program, and a certified pet care consultant based in Southern Illinois.

Nestlé Purina Voluntarily Recalls

Nestlé Purina Voluntarily Recalls Single Lot of Therapeutic Canned Cat Food Due to A Low Level of Thiamine (Vitamin B1)

Contact:

Consumer:
Nestlé Purina Veterinary Resource Center
1-800-982-8837

Media:
Bill Salzman
314-982-3806

Keith Schopp:
314-982-2577

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 11, 2012 – Nestlé Purina PetCare (NPP) is voluntarily recalling one specific lot of its Purina Veterinary Diets® OM Overweight Management canned cat food, available through veterinarians in the U.S. and Canada.  This precautionary measure is being taken in response to one consumer complaint received by FDA.  Analytical testing of the product sample by FDA indicated a low level of thiamine (Vitamin B1).  Purina has received no other complaints of thiamine-related or any other health issues related to this product.

Only cans with the following “Best By” date and production code shown are included in this voluntary recall:

Product Name  Can
Size
“Best By” Date &
Production Code*
Can UPC
Code
Purina Veterinary Diets® OM
(Overweight Management) Feline Formula
5.5 oz. JUN 2013   11721159 38100 – 13810

*“Best By” Date and Production Code are found on the bottom of the can.

Cats fed this affected lot exclusively for several weeks may be at risk for developing a thiamine deficiency.  Thiamine is essential for cats.  Symptoms of deficiency displayed by an affected cat can be gastrointestinal or neurological in nature.  Early signs of thiamine deficiency may include decreased appetite, salivation, vomiting and weight loss.  In advanced cases, neurological signs can develop, which may include ventriflexion (bending towards the floor) of the neck, wobbly walking, falling, circling and seizures.  Contact your veterinarian immediately if your cat is displaying any of these signs.  If treated promptly, thiamine deficiency is typically reversible.

This product was distributed to veterinary clinics between June, 2011 and May, 2012 throughout the U.S. and Canada.  The product is not sold in retail stores.

No additional Purina cat or dog products are involved in this voluntary recall.  No other Purina Veterinary Diets® products are involved, and only Purina Veterinary Diets® OM canned cat food which match the “Best By” dates and production code above are included in this recall.

Consumers who have purchased Purina Veterinary Diets® OM canned cat food cans with these specific “Best By” Date and Production Codes should discontinue feeding the product, and discard it.

At Nestlé Purina PetCare, the safety and efficacy of our products are our top priority.  We apologize for any inconvenience due to this voluntary recall.  For further information or to obtain a product refund, please contact Nestlé Purina as follows:

U.S. Consumers & Veterinarians:
Call toll-free             1-800-982-8837       Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Central Time, or visit www.purinaveterinarydiets.com .

Canadian Consumers & Veterinarians:
Call toll-free             1-866-884-8387       Monday – Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time, or visit www.purina.ca

While some dog foods proudly fly American flags on their packaging or tout that they are “made in America”, that doesn’t mean the ingredients are all sourced in the U.S. It means they are assembled in the U.S.

Yet another example of why it makes sense to get dog food from a company that has tighter quality control methods in place and has never had recalls, voluntary or FDA.  Companies like Life’s Abundance make food from higher grade ingredients and in small batches which significantly improves quality control.  And having the food on autoship means if there ever is a problem, the batches can be tracked quickly to avoid serious problems. I am actually wondering why Purina refuses to recall the toxic dog chicken jerky treats made from China that are either making dogs very sick or killing them, here is a cat food recall.

Joyce Rheal is Emergency Planning Committee chairwoman of the National Association Professional Pet Sitters and with Pets-life. Joyce is also a federally certified for FEMA’s “Animals in Disasters” program, and a certified pet care consultant based in Southern Illinois.

Diamond Pet Foods Dog and Cat Food Recall #2

Diamond Naturals Small Breed Adult Dog Lamb & Rice Formula dry dog food was produced in the Meta, Missouri plant not the Gaston, SC plant where other recalls originated. This makes it now the second Diamond Pet Food Manufacturing plant that has a product on recall due to Salmonella.

This recall was announced late Friday on May 18, 2012.

It is likely that we will see more recalls as we did from the South Carolina Plant.  Here are the products that are on recall

Production Code        Best Before Date
DSL0801                     26-Aug-2012
DSL0801                     26-Aug-2012
DSL0801                     27-Sept- 2012 (Manufactured 8/26/2011 & Packaged on 9/28/2011)

DSL0801                     18-Oct-2012 (Manufactured 8/26/2011 & packaged on 10/18/2011)

MY FIRST QUESTION IS why are the products packaged later then they were manufactured?

MY SECOND QUESTION IS as this dog food is sitting around for packaging what conditions are prevalent that would allow Salmonella to grow?

How can you find out if your food is on the list?  Diamond has set up a special website,  www.diamondpetrecall.com, for more information. The company is working with distributors and retailers to ensure all affected product is removed from shelves.

Pet owners who are unsure if the product they purchased is included in the recall, or who would like replacement product or a refund, may contact Diamond Pet Foods via a toll free call at  1-866-918-8756, Monday through Sunday, 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. EST.

Pet parents should wash their hands after coming in contact with dry pet food.  Pets who have ingested contaminated food can also make household members sick.

 

What are the symptoms in humans? Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever are indications of salmonella poisoning. Rarely, salmonella can result in more serious ailments including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

 

What are some non-Diamond pet foods that might be good alternatives?  It’s understandable that pet owners would be wary of simply replacing their Diamond product with another from a different lot. Customers who want affordable alternatives to Diamond’s Chicken Soup or Taste of the Wild might consider Life’s Abundance, Earthborn or Fromm brands. They are of comparable price.  In 14 years of business, Life’s Abundance has never been recalled.

 

While some dog foods proudly fly American flags on their packaging or tout that they are “made in America”, that doesn’t mean the ingredients are all sourced in the U.S. It means they are assembled in the U.S. This expanding recall is yet another example of why it makes sense to get dog food from a company that has tighter quality control methods in place and has never had recalls, voluntary or FDA.  Companies like Life’s Abundance make food from higher grade ingredients and in small batches which significantly improves quality control.  And having the food on autoship means if there ever is a problem, the batches can be tracked quickly to avoid serious problems.

 

What are symptoms of salmonella infection in dogs and cats?

Initial symptoms include:

  • Decreased appetite
  • Fever
  • Abdominal pain

 

If your pet has consumed dry food from one of the tainted lots and has symptoms of salmonella infection, please contact your veterinarian.

If left untreated, dogs may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has symptoms of salmonella infection, please contact your veterinarian.

Joyce Rheal is Emergency Planning Committee chairwoman of the National Association Professional Pet Sitters and with Pets-life. Joyce is also a federally certified for FEMA’s “Animals in Disasters” program, and a certified pet care consultant based in Southern Illinois.